The oral nature of the Homeric simile.

by William C. Scott

Publisher: Brill in Leiden

Written in English
Cover of: The oral nature of the Homeric simile. | William C. Scott
Published: Pages: 212 Downloads: 142
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Places:

  • Greece.

Subjects:

  • Homer -- Literary style.,
  • Greek language -- Figures of speech.,
  • Oral-formulaic analysis.,
  • Oral tradition -- Greece.,
  • Rhetoric, Ancient.,
  • Simile.

Edition Notes

StatementBy William C. Scott.
SeriesMnemosyne. Bibliotheca classica Batava. Supplementum
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPA4177.S5 S3
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 212 p.
Number of Pages212
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5096964M
ISBN 109004037896
LC Control Number74168778

The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile (Leiden: Brill, ), by William C. Scott (multiple formats at Dartmouth Digital Publishing) Homeric Questions, by Gregory Nagy (HTML at ) Filed under: Kenya. Kenya: A Country Study (Washington: Headquarters, Dept. of the Army, c), by American University Foreign Area Studies and United States. The Artistry of the Homeric Simile William C. Scott Dartmouth College Press: Contents • Preface • Similes, the Shield of Achilles, and Other Digressions • The Usefulness of Book Divisions • The Simileme: The Background of the Homeric Simile • The Oral Nature of Homeric Verse • The Simileme • Homer and His Audience • Simile and. CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): Simile (E. J. Brill: Leiden, ) has been issued as an electronic book by the Dartmouth College Library in The electronic versions of both books are publicly available for . In spite of the fact that Homeric similes have undergone exhaustive analysis, interest in them has been renewed in recent years, though the focus of research has shifted from studying their classification [] to exploring their oral function [] and the way they generate meaning. [] Drawing both on the rich groundwork done on the field of simile categorization and on the solid foundations of.

The word "Homeric" is based on the Greek author, Homer, who composed the two famous Greek epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey. William Clyde Scott, in his book The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile, suggests that Homer’s similes are original based on the similarities of the similes and their surrounding narrative text. Scott argues that. Get this from a library! The homeric simile in comparative perspectives: oral traditions from Saudi Arabia to Indonesia. [Jonathan L Ready] -- Presenting a new take on what made the Homeric epics such successful examples of verbal artistry, this volume explores the construction of the Homeric simile and the performance of Homeric poetry. Get this from a library! The Homeric simile in comparative perspectives: oral traditions from Saudi Arabia to Indonesia. [Jonathan L Ready] -- Presenting a new take on what made the Homeric epics such successful examples of verbal artistry, this volume explores the construction of the Homeric simile and the performance of Homeric poetry.   OUP () h/b pp £ (ISBN ) R. has already established his reputation as a specialist in the study of Homeric similes with innovative theoretical approaches with his book Character, Narrator, and Simile in the he tops it with this new monograph which not only draws on his expertise in the Homeric simile, but also deploys an impressive range of .

Preface ; CHAPTER ONE; Similes, the Shield of Achilles, and Other Digressions ; The Usefulness of Book Divisions ; CHAPTER TWO; The Simileme: The Background of the Homeric Simile ; The Oral Nature of Homeric Verse ; The Simileme ; Homer and His Audience ; Simile and Simileme ; CHAPTER THREE; Homer's Use of Similes to Delineate. "The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile". Leiden, Brill, In her article "On Homer’s Similes", Eleanor Rambo agrees with Scott that the similes are intentional, also noting that Homer’s use of similes deepen the reader’s understanding of the individual or action taking place through a word-picture association that the reader is able. A Homeric simile, also called an epic simile, is a detailed comparison in the form of a simile that is many lines in length. The word "Homeric" is based on the Greek author, Homer, who composed the two famous Greek epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey. Many authors continue to use this type of simile in their writings. The typical Homeric simile makes a comparison to some kind of event, in the. On the day that UPNE released the print book for sale in October , the Library launched a website containing freely available online copies (and also including an ebook version of Professor Scott's The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile, published by Brill in and long out of print). The print version refers to the online text on its.

The oral nature of the Homeric simile. by William C. Scott Download PDF EPUB FB2

His other publications include The Artistry of the Homeric Simile, Musical Design in Aeschylean Theater, Plato’s The Republic with Richard W. Sterling, and Musical Design in Sophoclean Theater. About the Electronic Publication.

This electronic publication of The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile was made possible with the permission of the author. The University Press of New England created EPUB and.

The Online Books Page The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile. Title: The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile: Author: Scott, William C. (William Clyde), Note: Leiden: Brill, Link: multiple formats at Dartmouth Digital Publishing: Stable link here.

The Homeric Simile in Comparative Perspectives: Oral Traditions from Saudi Arabia to Indonesia investigates both the construction of the Homeric simile and the performance of Homeric poetry from neglected comparative perspectives, offering a revealing exploration of what made the epics such powerful examples of verbal d into two parts, the volume first considers similes in five 5/5(1).

The Artistry of the Homeric Simile Paperback – Novem His previous publications include The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile, Musical Design in Aeschylean Theater, Plato’s The Republic with Richard W.

Sterling, and Musical Design in Sophoclean by: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Scott, William C. (William Clyde), Oral nature of the Homeric simile. Leiden, Brill, (OCoLC) DE NOVIS LIBRIS IUDICIA W. SCOTT, The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile (Mnemosyne, Suppl.

28). Leiden, Brill, IX, p. 56. This book is a valuable contribution to our insight into the hand- ling of the simile in the Homeric epic, "the placement, the choice of subject matter, the use of the simile in telling the tale, and the technique by which the simile is extended" (z.

The Homeric Simile in Comparative Perspectives: Oral Traditions from Saudi Arabia to Indonesia investigates both the construction of the Homeric simile and the performance of Homeric poetry from neglected comparative perspectives, offering a revealing exploration of what made the epics such powerful examples of verbal artistry.5/5(1).

The Homeric Simile in Comparative Perspectives: Oral Traditions from Saudi Arabia to Indonesia investigates both the construction of the Homeric simile and the performance of Homeric poetry from neglected comparative perspectives, offering a revealing exploration of what made the epics such powerful examples of verbal artistry.

The Simileme: The Background of the Homeric Simile (14) The Oral Nature of Homeric Verse (14) The Simileme (18) Homer and His Audience (31) Simile and Simileme (37) Chapter Three Homer’s Use of Similes to Delineate Character and Plot (42) Iliad, Book 2: Ironic Characterization (43) The Similes of Book 2 (44) The Role of Similes in Book 2 (59).

My earlier book, The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile, identified series of repeated simile topics and common locations in the narrative with the goal of revealing the oral basis for the content of many of the similes as well as their placement.

The current book, directed at the aesthetic qualities that Homer sought in forming each simile, represents that work’s other by: The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile (Scott) - Free ebook download as PDF File .pdf) or read book online for free. Scott, W.C. The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile.

Brill 5. Tree Similes 6. Wolf Similes 7. Deer Similes 8. Stele Similes 9. Diver Similes Hunting Similes Similes of Children Swarms of Insects Fish Similes River Similes Bird Similes similes as compositions derived from and dependent on an oral tradition.

The second study is rooted in the mixture of traditional materials pres- ent to the poet every time he considers adding a simile to his narrative. Preface • Similes, the Shield of Achilles, and Other Digressions • The Usefulness of Book Divisions • The Simileme: The Background of the Homeric Simile • The Oral Nature of Homeric Verse • The Simileme • Homer and His Audience • Simile and Simileme • Homer’s Use of Similes to Delineate Character and Plot • Iliad, Book 2: Ironic Characterization • The Similes of Book 2.

Similes, the Shield of Achilles, and Other Digressions (1) The Usefulness of Book Divisions (10) Chapter Two The Simileme: The Background of the Homeric Simile (14) The Oral Nature of Homeric Verse (14) The Simileme (18) Homer and His Audience (31) Simile and Simileme (37) Chapter Three Homer's Use of Similes to Delineate Character and Plot (42).

Homeric simile is called epic simile as well. The first recorded use of this type of simile was found in two of Homer’s greatest epics; hence, the name.

It is considered as the most prestigious type of simile. As it is used in epics, which are always given high status in poetry, Homeric similes used in them are also considered as esteemed. The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile (Leiden: Brill, ), by William C. Scott (multiple formats at Dartmouth Digital Publishing) Homeric Questions, by Gregory Nagy (HTML at ) Items below (if any) are from related and broader terms.

The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile (Leiden: Brill, ), by William C. Scott (multiple formats at Dartmouth Digital Publishing) Homeric Questions, by Gregory Nagy (HTML at ) Filed under: Yukon River Valley (Yukon and Alaska) -- Fiction. The Frontiersman: A Tale of the Yukon (c), by H.

Cody (Gutenberg text). Usually called an epithet or a Homeric epithet, but sometimes called a Homeric epitaph, it is one of the most noticeable features of Homer's works the Iliad and the t comes from the Greek for putting (something) on (something). It is a tag or nickname that can be used on its own or together with the real name, depending on other features of the Greek language.

The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile (Leiden: Brill, ), by William C. Scott (multiple formats at Dartmouth Digital Publishing) Homeric Questions, by Gregory Nagy (HTML at ) Filed under: Oral tradition -- India -- Tamil Nadu.

The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile, Princeton I, I 14 I have used the tabulations of LEE (above, note io); other classifications for the similes' subject-matter include: objects (e. lead, ivory, cauldron); people and activities (e. reapers, shepherd, gods, shipwright, fishing); mental activity (thought, dream).

On the other hand, William Clyde Scott, in his book The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile, suggests that Homer's similes are original based on the similarities of the similes and their surrounding narrative text. Scott argues that Homer primarily uses similes to introduce his characters, "sometimes to glorify them and sometimes merely to call attention to them.".

Preview. Five years after his Character, Narrator, and Simile in the Iliad 1 Jonathan L. Ready has published another book-length study of Homeric similes. The new volume entitled The Homeric Simile in Comparative Perspectives, however, has a very different take on similes than Ready’s previous monograph: instead of meticulous close readings, readers find a series of detailed comparative.

About the Electronic Publication. Professor Scott's first book, The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile (E. Brill: Leiden, ) has been re-issued as an electronic book by the Dartmouth College Library into coincide with the digital and print publication of The Artistry of the Homeric Simile.

The electronic versions of both books are publicly available for non-commercial uses, free of charge, at the. Homeric Similes in the Light of Oral Poetry JAMES A. NOTOPOULOS An essay-review of Dimitrios Petropoulos, La comparaison dans la chanson popu-laire grecque (Collection de l'Institut Frangais d'Athenes).

Athens, Pp. THOUGH THIS BOOK deals only inciden-tally with the Homeric simile, its treatment of the role and function of. Figurative language in The Odyssey consists of metaphors, personification, and epic or Homeric similes.

Epic similes are an elaborate comparison between two unlike objects using like or as. The Odyssey is an epic poem and epic similes in The Odyssey abound. Following are examples of epic similes in The Odyssey.

The Homeric Simile in Comparative Perspectives: Oral Traditions from Saudi Arabia to Indonesia investigates both the construction of the Homeric simile and the performance of Homeric poetry from neglected comparative perspectives.

The first part considers similes in five modern oral poetries—Rajasthani epic, South Sumatran epic, Kyrgyz epic, Bosniac epic, and Najdi lyric poems.

Oral Literature in the Digital Age: Archiving Orality and Connecting with Communities (Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers, c), ed.

by Mark Turin, Claire Wheeler, and Eleanor Wilkinson (PDF and HTML with commentary at ). The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile (Leiden: Brill, ), by William C.

Scott (multiple formats at Dartmouth Digital Publishing) Homeric Questions, by Gregory Nagy (HTML at ) Filed under: Indonesia. Indonesia: A Country Study (fifth edition, ), ed. by William H.

Frederick and Robert L. Worden (page image at HathiTrust). For an in-depth analysis, interpretation and understanding of the topic of similes, I would recommend you the two following books: 1. William C. Scott, The Oral Nature Of The Homeric Simile, available here.

William C. Scott, The Artistry of the. This book translates into English ten influential articles and extracts from books about Homer written in German over the past fifty years.

The work of prestigious scholars such as Wolfgang Schadenwaldt, Karl Reinhardt, and Hermann Fraenkel are represented. These key works, which cover suchtopics as similes, the end of the Odyssey, the adventures of Odysseus, the meeting of Hector and 4/5(1).Additional Physical Format: Print version: Scott, William C.

(William Clyde), Oral nature of the Homeric simile. Leiden, Brill, (DLC) S.'s recent book complements his earlier study, The Oral Nature of the Homeric Simile (Leiden, ), which sought to establish an oral basis for many Homeric similes by considering the persistent character of particular topics within them and their placement at certain recurrent points in the poems.

The current book extends.